TONIGHT. NO MORE BLOOD IN Mexico +10

Event: No More Blood in Mexico+10 

September 22, 2021 7-9 pm EST online

To register: 

amnesty.ca/NoMoreBloodInMexico

Ten years ago, deeply disturbed by lack of awareness or public discussion in Canada about an acute human rights crisis in Mexico, Carleton University, University of New Brunswick, Wilfrid Laurier University, and Amnesty International came together to organize a speaking tour to Canada by four human rights defenders from the frontlines in Mexico. Entitled No More Blood: Struggles for Peace and Human Rights in Mexico, the goal was to shine a spotlight on shocking levels of violence, forced disappearances and other grave human rights violations, and press Canadian authorities to put the protection of lives and rights at the heart of its engagement with Mexican counterparts. 

Ten years later, our Mexican human rights partners continue their vital work amid intensified violence and an unabated crisis, fueled by domestic realities, together with policies and pressures from outside countries. The need for public awareness, solidarity and support for movements for change has never been more important.

We will hear from courageous defenders from the same organizations who visited Canada in 2011, together with other respected human rights leaders, as they unpack what has and hasn’t changed in the last decade – and the challenges that must now be met to stop the bloodshed and achieve peace with justice in Mexico.

The speakers include:

Norma Don Juan is a Nahua Indigenous woman and a member of the Council of Women Leaders of the National Coordination of Indigenous Women (CONAMI-Mexico). She was part of the Collegiate Coordination team and the Collegiate Council of the Continental Liaison of Indigenous Women of the Americas (ECMIA). In 2019, she served as President of the Board of Directors of the First Women’s Parliament in Mexico City.

Grace Mahogany Fernández Morán is a member of BÚSCAME (Searching for the Disappeared Mexico), and the Citizen’s Council of the National Search System in Mexico. Ms Moran’s brother Dan Jeremeel Fernández was forcibly disappeared in Coahuila state in 2008 and her mother, Yolanda Moran Isais, who took part in No More Blood in Mexico in 2011, is a co-founder of United Forces for  Our  Disappeared  in  Coahuila  and  Mexico. 

Julia Quiñones is the coordinator of the Border Committee of Women Workers, the Comité Fronterizo de Obreras (CFO), in Coahuila, Mexico. The CFO is an organization of rank-and-file women, led by women and men who work in the maquiladoras. The organization was born out of the needs particularly of the young women who work in the factories.

Vidulfo Rosales is a lawyer who works for the Tlachinollan Human Rights Centre in Guerrero. The Centre carries out human rights monitoring, works closely with vulnerable Indigenous communities to defend their rights and has provided legal support for several emblematic cases involving abuses by state agents, including the disappearances of 43 students of a Teacher´s College in Ayotzinapa.  Tlachinollan received the MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions in 2008 and the Robert F Kennedy Human Rights Prize in 2012.

Mariano Machain is a human rights defender with Servicios para la Paz (SERAPAZ), an organization formed to continue and expand mediation work to find peaceful solutions to the conflict in Chiapas. SERAPAZ has broad experience at the local level in southern Mexico and plays an important role coordinating civil society initiatives in other regions, as well as research, training, counseling, advocacy and monitoring processes that contribute to building peace.

Alberto Xicotencatl Carrasco is the Director of the Casa del Migrante in Saltillo, Coahuila, and recipient of 2011 Letelier Moffitt Human Rights Award. His courageous work responds to the desperate situation facing tens of thousands of migrants travelling through Mexico, who are routinely victims of extortion, ill treatment, abduction, rape, and murder. Criminal gangs, often operating with the collusion or acquiescence of public officials, are responsible for many of these abuses.

No More Blood in Mexico +10

Ten years ago, deeply disturbed by lack of awareness or public discussion in Canada about an acute human rights crisis in Mexico, Carleton University, University of New Brunswick, Wilfrid Laurier University, and Amnesty International came together to organize a speaking tour to Canada by four human rights defenders from the frontlines in Mexico. Entitled No More Blood: Struggles for Peace and Human Rights in Mexico, the goal was to shine a spotlight on shocking levels of violence, forced disappearances and other grave human rights violations, and press Canadian authorities to put the protection of lives and rights at the heart of its engagement with Mexican counterparts. 

Ten years later, our Mexican human rights partners continue their vital work amid intensified violence and an unabated crisis, fueled by domestic realities, together with policies and pressures from outside countries. The need for public awareness, solidarity and support for movements for change has never been more important. 

MARK YOUR CALENDARS AND JOIN US ONLINE ON SEPTEMBER 22 at 7 PM EST FOR NO MORE BLOOD IN MEXICO +10 https://amnesty.ca/NoMoreBloodInMexico REGISTRATION REQUIRED

We will hear from courageous defenders from the same organizations who visited Canada in 2011, together with other respected human rights leaders, as they unpack what has and hasn’t changed in the last decade – and the challenges that must now be met to stop the bloodshed and achieve peace with justice in Mexico.

International Day of the Disappeared

In the last week, the families have achieved two important goals in their struggle to find their missing ones. The first one is the Mexican president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador’s request to the Senate to approve the competence of United Nations Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights to find the victims of disappearance as individual cases. This request by the families was constantly requested in previous presidential administrations, but this was rejected. The second achievement is the elaboration of a General Protocol for the Search of the Disappeared by the families of the Disappeared and Human Rights Organizations. This protocol has been sent to the Executive and the Legislative for prompt implementation as part of the main policies to search for the disappeared.

This is the press conference by the collective of the Movement for Our Disappeared in Mexico in the context of the International Day of the Disappeared.

Press here for access to the press conference

Press conference Day of the Disappeared

You can follow other live events today in Mexico in the following facebook page https://es-la.facebook.com/pg/movNDmx/posts/

Also join the campaign to support the families  https://www.change.org/p/firma-para-exigir-la-identificación-y-búsqueda-de-personas-desaparecidas-en-méxico

Press Release 10 May 2020, Saltillo, Coahuila. Ninth Mothers’ Day March–Searching for Our Missing Children.

United Forces for Our Disappeared in Coahuila (FUUNDEC), United Forces for Our Disappeared in Mexico (FUNDEM) and Human Rights Centre Fray Juan de Larios

One more year, the mothers of the disappeared spent Mother’s Day searching for their disappeared children and husbands. It is another year in which they continue to demand the Mexican State for access to truth and justice. For the last ten years, the Mexican State continues to ignore these demands and has shown insensibility to the suffering of mothers from Mexico, Central America and other parts of the world.

Continue reading

Press Release 10 May 2020, Saltillo, Coahuila. Ninth Mothers’ Day March–Searching for Our Missing Children.

United Forces for Our Disappeared in Coahuila (FUUNDEC), United Forces for Our Disappeared in Mexico (FUNDEM) and Human Rights Centre Fray Juan de Larios

One more year, the mothers of the disappeared spent Mother’s Day searching for their disappeared children and husbands. It is another year in which they continue to demand the Mexican State for access to truth and justice. For the last ten years, the Mexican State continues to ignore these demands and has shown insensibility to the suffering of mothers from Mexico, Central America and other parts of the world.

Continue reading

The Mexican Senate appoints 13 persons to the National Citizen Council of the National Search System

Fotografía-por-el-Senado

The Senate of the Republic appointed 13 persons to the National Citizen Council, composed of 5 relatives of disappeared persons, 4 human rights specialists and 4 representatives of human rights organizations, who will participate for a period of three years.

  • Francisco Olvera Acevedo, Grace Mahogany Fernández Morán, Mirna Nereida Medina Quiñonez, Margarita Michelle Quevedo Orozco, and Edna Dolores Rosas Huerta were appointed as representatives of the family members.
  • Denise González Núñez and Santiago Corcuera Cabezut were appointed as specialists in the protection and defence of human rights. Volga Pilar de Pina Ravest, as a specialist in the search for disappeared or non-localized persons and Mercedes Celina Doretti, as a specialist in forensic matters.
  • Humberto Francisco Guerrero Rosales, Juan Martín Pérez García, Consuelo Gloria Morales Elizondo and Norma Patricia Quintero Serrano were selected as representatives of human rights organizations.

The National Citizen Council is a consultative body of the National Search System, created after the recent enactment of the General Law on Disappearance of Persons. Its objective is to advise both the System and the National Search Commission on the implementation of actions, policy-making and projects, in order to expand its capacities with the contribution of specialists in the matter.

The University of Milan awards an honorary degree to Vera Jarach, Estela de Carlotto and Yolanda Morán, the Mothers of the Disappeared in Argentina and Mexico.

The Academic Senate of the State University of Milan unanimously approved the granting of the honorary title of Master’s Degree in International Relations to three women who, according to the Senate’s resolution “represent in a particularly significant way the movements born in Argentina and later in Mexico for the rights of the victims of enforced disappearances and who are testimony to an untiring commitment in the defense of human rights and in the search for truth and justice”.

The representatives of the historic Plaza de Mayo, Vera Vigevani Jarach and Estela Barnes de Carlotto, respectively Mother of the Plaza de Mayo-Linea Founder and President of the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo, and Yolanda Morán Isais, who in recent years took charge of the same mission in Mexico, coordinating FUNDEM – Fuerzas Unidas por Nuestros Desaparecidos en México, will receive the recognition.

The honorary degrees, proposed by the Department of International, Legal and Historical-Political Studies of the State University, will be awarded during the opening ceremony of the academic year, which will take place in February.

Press Release (italian)

UT Human Rights Clinic to Brief Congress on Enforced Disappearances in Mexico

2017-hrc-coahuilareport-en-hero-1-960x540On Thursday October 5, 2017 at 10:00 Ariel Dulitzky spoke before the Human Rights Commission of the U.S. House of Representatives at a briefing on enforced disappearances in Mexico. Ariel Dulitzky is the Director of the Human Rights Clinic at the University of Texas School of Law. He highlighted key findings from a Human Rights Clinic report on the relationship between organized crime and the state in Coahuila, Mexico and the human rights violations, including disappearances, that have been committed there. The report analyzes the most important information arising out of witness testimonies from three U.S. federal trials against members of the Zeta cartel. The report maps out the hierarchical structure of the Zetas, documents the links between the Zetas and Coahuila state authorities, and identifies human rights abuses perpetrated by the cartel. Press this link to access the report.

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IAHCR) analyze the situation in Coahuila, Mexico.

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During the 165th Regular Session of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, representatives of the Diocesan Center for Human Rights Fray Juan de Larios, the Mexican Commission for the Defense and Promotion of Human Rights and the International Federation for Human Rights presented the report “Mexico: Murders, disappearances and torture in Coahuila de Zaragoza constitute crimes against humanity”, highlighting the fact that between 2009 and 2016, crimes against humanity were committed against humanity. As stated in the report, these crimes qualify as crimes against humanity and therefore fall within the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court.

At the hearing, representatives of the organizations addressed the collusion of Coahuila’s senior officials and security authorities with the Zetas cartel in the commission of crimes against humanity between 2009 and 2011. As well as the direct responsibility of state security authorities, through the Special Weapons and Tactics Group (GATE in spanish), in the commission of crimes against humanity between 2012 and 2016.

They also highlighted two particularly violent cases: the Allende massacre and the case of the Piedras Negras prison.

Despite the Mexican State’s representative delegation’s commitment to the investigation and punishment of murders, torture and enforced disappearances, they expressly rejected any kind of international cooperation to reverse impunity in the country (as they have refused to accept the establishment of the Advisory Council, recommended by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, with an international membership of experts in the field).

The IACHR review of the case will continue as they expect more information by the petitioners and the state representatives.

Watch the full hearing here (spanish/english)

General Law on Disappearance of Persons approved by the Legislative Branch in Mexico

 

Families salute the passage of the General Law on Disappearance of Persons, a tool to confront the grave crisis of disappearances and impunity in Mexico

On 12 October, the Chamber of Deputies approved the General Law on Forced Disappearance of Persons and Disappearances by Individuals. The families that make up the Movement for Our Disappeared Persons in Mexico (fb: MovNDmx) salute the approval of this law, because it is the result of almost three years of hard work by more than 60 families and civil society organizations (NGOs) that have proposed fundamental contents of this law and because if it is implemented effectively, it will be an important tool to confront the serious disappearance crisis in Mexico.

The Act creates a National Search System, a National Search Commission and 32 Local Search Commissions for missing persons, structures that incorporate the participation of relatives and civil society organizations, in order to find the whereabouts of our loved ones. In turn, the Act recognizes and punishes the crimes of enforced disappearance and disappearance committed by private individuals; promotes exhaustive investigations – through the creation of Specialized Prosecutor’s Offices; and establishes better conditions to approach truth, justice, punishment of the guilty parties, and to break the chronic patterns of impunity that involve this atrocious practice.

The Act also strengthens the National Register of Missing and Unrecognized Persons, which will contribute to sizing the disappearance crisis in the country and responding to the true magnitude of this painful problem.

The rights of the victims recognized in it will also open up new possibilities to provide comprehensive reparations and care for the thousands of missing persons and families who are going through this stormy road. This will only be possible if the authorities – of all levels of government – comply with their obligations and implement the Law correctly.

In the long and desperate search for our loved ones, faced with institutional inaction and collusion, we recognize in the Law a perfectible instrument, but also necessary and urgent as a first step to prevent, eradicate, combat and sanction disappearances.

However, the Legislative Branch’s obligation does not end with the approval of this Law. The Chamber of Deputies has the inescapable duty to allocate a sufficient budget for its immediate and correct implementation during this same session. This is a basic condition for the Act to operate effectively in favour of the thousands of missing persons in the country and their families, and to prevent the realization of criminal conduct.

In addition, we families demand that the Executive Branch publish the Law immediately, this is a historic opportunity to respond to tens of thousands of families that we can no longer expect, committing this administration to lay the foundations for its full compliance.

The road is just beginning, approval is one more step and implementation will be a challenge. For this reason, we demand to recognize our experience and ensure our participation at all times: without families there can be no effective and legitimate implementation of the Law.

#SinLasFamiliasNo

Kindly

Movimiento por Nuestros Desaparecidos en México (Movement for Our Missing Persons in Mexico)

Bulletin in Spanish