The Mexican Senate appoints 13 persons to the National Citizen Council of the National Search System

Fotografía-por-el-Senado

The Senate of the Republic appointed 13 persons to the National Citizen Council, composed of 5 relatives of disappeared persons, 4 human rights specialists and 4 representatives of human rights organizations, who will participate for a period of three years.

  • Francisco Olvera Acevedo, Grace Mahogany Fernández Morán, Mirna Nereida Medina Quiñonez, Margarita Michelle Quevedo Orozco, and Edna Dolores Rosas Huerta were appointed as representatives of the family members.
  • Denise González Núñez and Santiago Corcuera Cabezut were appointed as specialists in the protection and defence of human rights. Volga Pilar de Pina Ravest, as a specialist in the search for disappeared or non-localized persons and Mercedes Celina Doretti, as a specialist in forensic matters.
  • Humberto Francisco Guerrero Rosales, Juan Martín Pérez García, Consuelo Gloria Morales Elizondo and Norma Patricia Quintero Serrano were selected as representatives of human rights organizations.

The National Citizen Council is a consultative body of the National Search System, created after the recent enactment of the General Law on Disappearance of Persons. Its objective is to advise both the System and the National Search Commission on the implementation of actions, policy-making and projects, in order to expand its capacities with the contribution of specialists in the matter.

Mexican Senate approves National Law Against Disappearances

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After two years and two months, the Mexican Upper Chamber of Congress approved the National Law Against Forced Disappearance and Disappearance by Non-State Actors. This has taken place four decades after the disappearances of the 1970s and the widespread practice by state and non-state actors since 2006. The families of the disappeared have stated that this law does not do enough to search for the disappeared and give families access to justice. However, they are willing to support the law in order to introduce further changes to it once it is approved. In what follows, there is a translation of the families’ assessment of the law passed by the Senate.

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Briefing note on events related to disappearances in Mexico from February 5 to March 5, 2015

March 9, 2015. DuringNormalAyotzinapa-compartimos-el-dolor-a the month of February, Mexico’s General Prosecutor’s Office (PGR) attempted to close the case of the 43 disappeared students of Ayotzinapa by arguing that, based on the testimonies from witnesses and evidence gathered in a landfill site in Cocula Guerrero, the students were incinerated by the criminal group Guerreros Unidos. The Argentine Forensic Team questioned this as they were not present during the collection of evidence in Cocula. The Forensic Team was also concerned about the possible manipulation of evidence in order to fit the PGR’s conclusions. Academics from Mexico’s National University also question the PGR’s argument and indicated that the physical evidence provided by the former contradicts the incineration argument. According to these experts, the burning of bone tissues requires special equipment, which was not available in the landfill site. Continue reading

Tomorrow is the International Day of the Disappeared. Mexican families draw attention to the fate of their relatives

August 30th is the International Day of the Disappeared. This day raises awareness of the fate of individuals whose whereabouts is unknown to their relatives and/or legal representatives in cases of involuntary disappereances because of armed conflict or authoritarian regimes. In preparation for this day, different human rights organizations and families of the disappeared are carrying out different events tomorrow throughout Mexico. Please support the families by sending a twitter to Mexico’s president asking him to #findthedisappeared@PresidenciaMX

If the twitter messages come from abroad, you will giving the families a lot of support.

CARTEL 30 AGOSTO(1)

Briefing note. Discussion of the Declaration of Absence in Cases of Disappearance

The effects of the crisis on unemployment, wages and benefits have put Mexicans in a situation of economic insecurity. Disappearances complicate the economic circumstances of a victim’s family. The disappeared contributed with an important share of the household income through wages and social benefits such as health care and government housing assistance in the National Workers Housing Fund Institute (Instituto Nacional para el Fomento de la Vivienda de los Trabajadores or INFONAVIT). Families of the disappeared cannot receive any pension payments because the whereabouts of the victim is unknown, and therefore she or he cannot be declared dead. Also, the situation of uncertainty and worry for their loved ones has impacted families’ physical and emotional health. Health expenses therefore add to the costs of investigation and litigation in the absence of state authorities’ investigations in the context of economic and physical insecurity in the country.

If families want to retain social benefits and receive some form of pension, they have to apply for the presumption of death of the victim, which takes up to six year at least to complete. This impacts families emotionally because once the person is presumed dead, investigations end. Thus, families feel they betrayed their disappeared by having to choose access to basic services over looking for their missing relative.

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